Traditional Cold Cures…

Well it’s that time of year when it’s quite likely someone at work, school etc will get a cold and it will do the rounds. Stocking up on ways to take care of  yourself when you feel poorly is a good idea at any time, and especially in Winter. We have some more posts coming about vitamins and hankies, so I will add the links here when they go ‘live’.

 

When you look at the list of ingredients on a packet of cold cure powder or tablets it can feel a little overwhelming, they are also very expensive even if you buy the store brands. To be honest you may do just as well with paracetomol and a honey and lemon drink. Over on the Less-Stuff post for today is a brilliant home cold cure made with store cupboard ingredients you might like to try; it also features on page 22 of our Eco-Friendly Autumn book. Here are some other traditional cold cures for the more adventureous…

 

  • Using Echinacea tablets or tea BEFORE you get poorly is a popular prevention herb. Take a look at the actual content of echinacea – this is one instance when you do get what you pay for, but a low % is really not worth bothering with so you need to go all in.
  • The main help is actually keeping fully hydrated – drinking lots of fluids and soups or broth.
  • For a sore throat you could try gargling with salt water.
  • For a blocked nose pop some eucalyptus drops onto a burning candle or oil burner (safely of course). You can also add a few drops on your pillow at night. You could also try a salt nasal rinse…
  • Some people think vaporub on their feet at night helps…
  • A traditional steam bath can work wonders on a head cold, boiling water in a large bowl that you put your face over (NOT IN) with a towel over your head and breath in the warm air to release the phlegm. You can add a few drops of decongestant aids, check online for advice first. A steamy shower might also help.
  • If you have metal radiators on, you can also make the air damper and easier to breath by putting a wet flannel on top over night, this can work well in a childs room as no chemicals are needed.
  • Wrap up warm when you go out and make sure you take off any wet clothes as quickly as possible.
  • Encourage children to learn to cover their mouth and nose when they sneeze and cough – and avoid large groups when you or someone with you is ill.

Please share...

Liked it? Take a second to support @thefrugalfamily on Patreon!